The Anatomy of a Competition – Part Two

 

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Well, kinda-sorta…

Part Two of the competition journey shows the making of a cocktail dress that rose from the frustration of a gown – namely, this gown. I had seen the ‘babydoll‘ concepts on a number of 60s fashions, and with that A-line silhouette made famous by designers such as Yves Saint Laurent, I was pretty sure this was were I wanted to go. This post is mostly images and captions, so you can browse with your eyes – you’re welcome

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Use the same concept as the gown – but without curved seaming…

Girl needs a skirt...

Girl needs a skirt…

Drape circular piece and pin...

Drape circular piece and pin…

Trim to make a graduated fall...and hope it doesn't look like a maternity dress...

Trim to make a graduated fall…and hope it doesn’t look like a maternity dress…

Remove, measure and transfer to paper...

Remove, measure and transfer to paper…

Cut pieces for shell and lining...

Cut pieces for shell and lining…

That's alot of pattern pieces for a miniature dress...but it does work...

That’s alot of pattern pieces for a miniature dress…but it does work…

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Cut silk chiffon (from Lyon, France) – thin transparent – like sewing air…

I thought he idea of matching tights would be a nice touch...

I thought he idea of matching tights would be a nice touch…

Groovy, but to juvenile for what I was looking for - and yet, for some odd reason I put a fashion 'teen' in an opera gown...go figure...

Groovy, but too juvenile for what I was looking for – and yet, for some odd reason I put a fashion ‘teen’ in an opera gown…go figure…

Make rolled hem on the chiffon layer...

Make rolled hem on the chiffon layer…

Construct the bodice...and line...

Construct the bodice…and line…

After the chiffon is attached, it has a nice bounce to it...but added beading later would give some weight to the drape...

After the chiffon is attached, it has a nice bounce to it…but added beading later would give some weight to the drape…

Make the skirt...

Make the skirt…

Pretty...

Pretty…

Before lining goes in...hand-sew the beaded motifs...

Before lining goes in…hand-sew the beaded motifs…

Install zipper...

Install zipper…

Lining is ready...

Lining is ready…you’ll also see some sample beading on the chiffon, which will go all the way around…

Sew down the lining...

Sew down the lining…

Clean as a whistle...

Clean as a whistle…

Bead the rolled hem of the chiffon...

Bead the rolled hem of the chiffon…

Make and bead the shawl...

Make and bead the shawl…

Wrap it all up in a bow...

Wrap it all up in a bow…

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Rosa – One-of-a-kind Cocktail Ensemble by Tom Courtney – to fit 16inch Tulabelle by Integrity Toys

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Rosa – One-of-a-kind Cocktail Ensemble by Tom Courtney – to fit 16inch Tulabelle by Integrity Toys

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Rosa – One-of-a-kind Cocktail Ensemble by Tom Courtney – to fit 16inch Tulabelle by Integrity Toys

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Rosa – One-of-a-kind Cocktail Ensemble by Tom Courtney – to fit 16inch Tulabelle by Integrity Toys

Voila! Going for this whole Christina Hendricks thing – isn’t it just mad?

Groovy chick...

Groovy chick…

 

10 thoughts on “The Anatomy of a Competition – Part Two

  1. I love both outfits! Thank you for sharing the “anatomy” stories. What a wonderful idea – to weigh down the fabric with seed beads! I hope you have better luck next time fitting in the unspoken requirements of the contest. I’m curious now about the winning entries – I must have missed the link to the photos.

    • Thanks, Arina! I sent my images to Haute Doll Magazine…but I have since added two images borrowed from the winners. Haven’t connected with the Advanced Category Winner, but hope to add that when I do. Thanks, again!!!

  2. did you make your own patterns or kind of free hand off your dolls body (have seen some people make patterns from wrapped plastic around the doll and cut into parts, I’m not that advanced yet). I have almost all the commercial patterns though and per a costume sewers suggestions, not have my patterns cut from sew in interfacing to use so I don’t destroy the original tissue patterns.

My blog is satire, but your thoughts are welcome!

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